Tree Collards

Tree collards are a important Permaculture plant in zones 7 – 10. They are not really a tree. But, are 5 – 7 feet tall. A single stalk with purple tinted leaves. The leaves are tender and delicious in cool weather.

They are rich in calcium, vitamin B1, B2, and C. They also have anti viral, anti bacterial, and anti cancer properties. And high in fiber! Sounded good to me. I acquired some cuttings from Bountiful Gardens. Here they are newly planted and coming alive.

Leaves sprouting on the tree collard cuttings.

Leaves sprouting on the tree collard cuttings.

The instructions said they will leaf out , then stop and develop roots, then leaf out more. I will be moving them to the side garden when I think they are strong enough.
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Miscellaneous things happening

The beneficial insect bed is done. Planted with some plants I picked up on clearance. Golden Rod, Aster, Cone flower, Cat Mint, Bee Balm, Russian Sage and a Perennial verbena to trail over the edge. Also seeded some Cleone. Mulched the bed with some well rotted wood chips. Moved an old stump in and put a bird bath on it. I will add some rocks to it so bees and insects can get a drink. Here the new bed.

Benefical insect plants.

Benefical insect plants.

The trays  on the ledge have baby Artichokes and baby Rhubarb growing in them. Not ready to be planted out until next year. Some garlic chives growing in one of the concrete block openings behind the bird bath.

Baby Rubarb and tiny artichoke plants.

Baby Rhubarb and tiny artichoke plants.

See the two block high wall behind it? That is the next elevation change. It will entail moving the dirt out, adding logs, branches and vegetation debris. THEN, putting the dirt back.

Dirt to be dug out to creat the next Huglekultur.

Dirt to be dug out to creat the next Huglekultur

On the left side, I need to create a deep and wide area for a dwarf apple tree. It is one that had failure to thrive. In fact, I thought it was a goner. But, dug it up and planted it in the green house bed with lots of worm compost. Look at it now!

This apple tree has sprouted a bunch of new leaves.

This apple tree has sprouted a bunch of new leaves.

I need to get it outside so that it will realize Fall is upon us and harden off for Winter. Maybe, I gave it too much worm compost! Well, I gave it a chance to live and it decided to. Now, will it start shutting down for Winter?

I received my perennial onion bulbs. I forgot I ordered them. Need to get a bed ready for them. I am thinking the back left Huglekultur bed might be good.

Also got my Tree Collards. I planted them in pots and they are leafing out. They grow 5 -6 feet tall. So they need to be somewhere that they will not shade something else. I have a spot picked out for them on the right side that is not created yet. They need time to develop roots before they can be planted. So, I am good.

Leaves sprouting on the tree collard cuttings.

Leaves sprouting on the tree collard cuttings.

A friend gave me some blackberry trimmings. I am trying to root them. Don’t know if it will work. So far so good. I have them in upside down plastic shelf units with water in them. Keep them moist from the bottom.

Blackberry cuttings.

Blackberry cuttings.

After all these ugly construction photos – here is something pretty!

Spider lillies or Disappearing Ladies.

Spider lillies or Disappearing Ladies.

 

 

The Ultimate Worm Bin

My son built me a huge worm bin before he moved to the mid-west.

It looks like a huge coffin on legs!

It looks like a huge coffin on legs!

It is high enough, that I do not have to bend over. The lid is hinged.

The lid has two sides. I just prop it with a 2x2.

The lid has two sides. I just prop it with a 2×2.

Happy worms eating kitchen scrapes and shredded paper. I cover them with leaves and black plastic.

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Now for the best idea of all. This worm bin is self-sorting. He installed hardware cloth divisions. When one side gets pretty full of worm castings – I just quit feeding that side and feed the side next to it. The worms go through the hardware cloth to get to the food. And I am left with worm free castings!

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I try to always give my baby plants a fist full of worm castings when they are transplanted.

Something pretty!

Tthought I would show you my very happy Clematis. It is a Sweet Autumn. It has spread over the arch into the Upper Garden and on to the side fence. I have had to give it several hair cuts to be able to go into the upper garden area.

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See the tall trees. They are on three sides. That is why I have so little sun and have to turn this area into a shade garden.

I guess Autumn is on it’s way. Yeah, cooler weather! 😄

Side Garden Update

My new helper came the other day. His name is Mike. He is 34 and a nice young man. I am pleased.  He is a gardener and he has chickens! And he is sooooo interested in Permaculture. He is learning about Permaculture and I am getting some of the HEAVY work done. Here is a picture of the raised beds after 6 hours of Mike.

Wall is 2 blocks high 8' on one side and 20' on the other. Lots of dirt moved.

Wall is 2 blocks high 8′ on one side and 20′ on the other. Lots of blocks and dirt moved.

The mound on the right was a Huglekulture - not easy to move. So this part of the path is narrow,

The mound on the right was a Huglekultur – not easy to move. So this part of the path is narrow,

And a lot of clay was dug up and dumped in the ditches of the new central path. Getting close to where we can get a cart down it.

 

It will get smoother and mulched.

It will get smoother and mulched.

And blocks were removed from the raised bed in the Greenhouse and toted to the garden for those raised beds. The dirt will get moved as we need it.

Not pretty, but work in process!

Not pretty, but work in process!

Just a update. And a glimmer of what is to come.